35594 Cedar Valley Lane, Rehoboth Beach, De 19971 | $384,900

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Property Details

Welcome to Cedar Valley, a sought after 55+ community with low HOA fees ($250 per year) in Rehoboth close to shopping, restaurants and the beach! Lovely entrance/courtyard setting invites you in to this 3BR, 2BA rancher with the perfect layout. Ki
  • MLS Number: 731641
  • Status: Active
  • Price: $384,900
  • Property Type:
  • Area: Lewes And Rehoboth Hundred
  • Community: Cedar Valley
  • School District: Cape Henlopen
  • Square Footage: 1,876
  • Year Built: 2003
  • Bedrooms: 3
  • Full Bathrooms: 2
  • Number of Stories: 1
  • New Construction: No
  • County Taxes: $1,199
  • Association Fee: $240
  • Furnished: No
  • Lot Square Feet: 10,019
  • Lot Size Acres: 0.23
  • Water: Private Central Water
  • Sewer: Public Central Sewer
  • Community Amenities: 55+ Community

Interior Features

  • Kitchen: Eat In, Pantry
  • Fireplace: Gas
  • Heating: Forced Air, Solar Active
  • Cooling: Central A/C
  • Flooring: Hardwood, Vinyl
  • Basement: Basement - Full,Unfinished,Walkout Stairs
  • Appliances: Cable TV Pre Wired, Dishwasher, Disposal, Exhaust Fan, Fridge w/Ice Maker, Garage Door Opener, Microwave, Oven/Range Gas, Oven-Self Cleaning, Sump Pump, Water Heater Gas
  • Interior Features: Bedroom-Entry Level, Built In Bookcases, Cable TV Prewired, Ceiling Fan(s), Fireplace-Gas, MBED-Full Bath, Screen(s), Storm Door(s), Storm Window(s), Tub-Soaking/Whirlpool, Walk-In Closets

Exterior Features

  • Style: Contemporary
  • Construction Type: Stick/Frame
  • Exterior Type: Stone, Vinyl Siding
  • Roofing: Architectural Shingle
  • Foundation: Poured Concrete
  • Garage: Attached
  • Garage Size: 2
  • Parking: Driveway/Off Street, Garage
  • Porch/Deck/Patio: Patio - Rear, Porch - Front, Three Season Room
  • Exterior Features: Fencing-Full, Irrigation System

Listing Courtesy of RE/MAX REALTY GROUP REHOBOTH

Rehoboth Beach Mortgage Watchers Eye ‘Wealth Building Home Loa

Something new is stirring in the ordinarily hidebound world of residential mortgage offerings: a new way of approaching the financing of home purchases. If successful, it might well shift the way some Rehoboth Beach mortgage contracts are written.

The experiment is known as the "Wealth Building Home Loan," and it addresses a home-ownership problem that has been talked about for a long time, with little being done to solve it. The issue in question is how to unburden new homeowners from spending years in a situation that bears more resemblance, financially, to renting than to owning— especially during the first 3 to 5 years. For low- and moderate-income mortgagees, that’s the difference between sinking into more debt and actually building wealth. After all, every dollar that goes toward interest is lost, while dollars that pay down principal are investments.

According to Edward Pinto, one of the authors of the WBHL, often during the opening years of a 30-year loan, "68% goes to pay interest." In the new program, 77% of monthly payments go to pay off principal—with the result that in a short time, new homeowners have a much larger equity stake in their homes. And, it is hoped, a sizeable increase in pride of ownership: "a stake in the game."

It sounds good, but you might be wondering how this could be possible. Is this just a ‘pie in the sky,’ feel-good idea that will never see daylight in the real world? Apparently not. The pilot program is being put into action by some serious players: the American Enterprise Institute (if that sounds like a conservative outfit, it is) and administered by the Neighborhood Assistance Corporation of America (if that sounds like a liberal outfit, ditto). And it’s being funded by Bank of America and Citi Mortgage—neither of which would be likely to bankroll some fly-by-night scheme.

The mechanics of this kind of mortgage work out like this. First, it’s based on a 15-year term, which of course speeds the rate at which equity builds; and second, it’s a mortgage that carries a very low interest rate. Something for nothing? Not quite: the concept is to

· change the underwriting standards to tilt away from credit history and toward recent payment history and residual income, thought to lower lender risk

· eliminate the down payment altogether, instead allocating that initial cash toward "points": buy-downs of the mortgage’s interest rate to .5%, (or even 0%)!

It boils down to an approach that could be a win-win. Borrowers (even those who suffered credit black marks during the economic downturn) could be newly eligible for a home loan, and because lenders pocket the interest rate buy-down amount, a proposition they might find acceptable.

Should Rehoboth Beach mortgage applicants expect this deal to be available next week? Not likely: it’s in the pilot phase. But if it seems to work out, it could be a shot in the arm for homeowners who can manage a slightly higher monthly payment. If you would like to chat about today’s home loan availability (or any other current Rehoboth Beach real estate doings), I hope you’ll give me a call!

 

Flipping or Buy-and-Hold? Strategic Choice for Rehoboth Beach In

When you own the Rehoboth Beach home your family lives in, you are by definition a real estate investor: it comes with the turf. Your investment is essentially a passive one. Until the day you decide to sell and move on, any improvement in its value is secondary to how well it serves to shelter your family.

How you think about your investment—and how you proceed to manage it—is altogether different when you buy a home purely as a financial venture. For one thing, you face an immediate strategic decision: will you be flipping for a quick short-term profit, or aim for the long term through a buy-and-hold strategy? You have to weigh some pros and cons in order to make the right decision.

Flipping

Pro: Capital is Freed

A flipping strategy minimizes the amount of time your investment capital is committed, freeing it for other uses. Should you identify another potentially lucrative investment, you will be able to take advantage of it.

Con: Unexpected Challenges

While flipping for short-term profit has definite ‘hands-on’ appeal, first-time investors can be surprised by unexpected complications. Properties that appear to be undervalued (and ripe for a quick flip!) may require costly fixes. Overspending on renovations quickly eats into profits, but underspending can lead to a lengthier holding time. Experienced Rehoboth Beach flipping veterans have learned to successfully gauge a property’s true turnaround value.

Additional Consideration: Taxes

Sussex County flipping has tax implications that impact the bottom line. Profits from a property owned more than a year are generally taxed at the ordinary income tax rate, while a property held for less than a year may be taxed at the capital gains rate. Local and state tariffs need to be considered as well—this is where input from a qualified professional is important.

Buy-and-Hold

Pro: Passive Investment

If management is outsourced to a professional property manager, the buy-and-hold strategy will require less personal attention than flipping does. Preparing a property for a flip often involves considerable time commitment and adept contractor schedule-juggling.

Con: Management Costs

The passive investment advantage holds true if outside management is contemplated— with commensurate expense. If you enjoy the challenge of successfully managing a property, this negative doesn’t apply.

Pro: Fewer Properties Need To Be Identified

Ultimately, successfully executing a flipping strategy means scrutinizing a huge number of properties over the course of time. In contrast, a buy-and-hold strategy necessitates finding only a few great bargains. Pursued intelligently, both buy-and-hold and quick flip strategies have proved profitable for many investors. Both call for finding solid value in Bethany Beach properties—which is where giving me a call comes in!