16567 Sweetwater Dr., Milton, De 19968 | $439,900

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Property Details

Don't miss out on this great rancher home which features a beautiful kitchen with granite countertops, and SS appliances, formal dining room, breakfast nook, great room with gas fireplace, split floor plan, large master and a wonderful sunroom with g
  • MLS Number: 726599
  • Status: Active
  • Price: $439,900
  • Property Type:
  • Area: Broadkill Hundred
  • Community: River Rock Run
  • School District: Cape Henlopen
  • Square Footage: 2,872
  • Year Built: 2014
  • Bedrooms: 3
  • Full Bathrooms: 2
  • Number of Stories: 1
  • New Construction: No
  • County Taxes: $1,511
  • Association Fee: $600
  • Furnished: No
  • Lot Dimensions: 92x332x162x382
  • Lot Square Feet: 35,284
  • Lot Size Acres: 0.81
  • Lot Description: Cleared
  • Water: Water-Private Central
  • Sewer: Gravity Septic

Interior Features

  • Kitchen: Breakfast Bar, Countertops - Granite, Island, Kitchen/Dining Room Combo
  • Fireplace: Gas
  • Heating: Heat Pump(s)
  • Cooling: Heat Pump(s)
  • Flooring: Carpet, Hardwood, Tile
  • Basement: Crawl Space-Conditioned,Sump Pump
  • Attic: Access Only
  • Security: Security System, Video Surveillance
  • Appliances: Cable TV Pre Wired, Cooktop, Dishwasher, Fridge w/Ice Maker, Garage Door Opener, Microwave, Oven-Wall, Sump Pump, Washer/Dryer Hookup Only, Water Heater Tankless
  • Interior Features: Bedroom-Entry Level, Cable TV Prewired, Ceiling Fan(s), Fireplace-Gas, MBED-Separate Shower and Tub, Pull-Down Attic Stairs, Storm Door(s), Walk-In Closets, Window Treatments

Exterior Features

  • Style: Contemporary,Rancher/Rambler
  • Construction Type: Stick/Frame
  • Exterior Type: Vinyl Siding
  • Roofing: Architectural Shingle
  • Foundation: Poured Concrete
  • Garage: Attached
  • Garage Size: 5
  • Parking: Driveway/Off Street, Garage Door Opener
  • Porch/Deck/Patio: Patio - Rear
  • Exterior Features: Irrigation System

Listing Courtesy of JACK LINGO LEWES

Ending Ocean View Mortgage Turndowns via Credit Report Action

For anyone who has looked into to buying a Ocean View home several times—but kept getting discouraged every time because of a negative credit report—read on!

You probably already know that you are not alone—but so what?—it’s small consolation, especially when you consider how much financial ground you lose every year you continue to pay rent (the entire amount of which has zero tax deductibility). Many people mishandle credit in their teens and 20s, not knowing how it can come back to bite them when credit reports determine their credit worthiness. In Ocean View, we see the fallout in the form of mortgage application turndowns or discouraging interest rate proposals.

But that just makes it all the more important that you stop letting past errors continue to keep you from getting the loans and rates you want. You can choose to take action now to clean up that credit score. Not only will it speed the moment when you become eligible for the significant benefits of home ownership—the actions you take now will serve to set you in the driver seat when it comes to credit management. You will become aware of any apparently minor oversights that can depress your credit score for years to come. It will put you ‘in the game’ of credit report management, instead of continuing to be a passive outsider.

Steps Ocean View consumers can take now:

Review your credit file for accurate information

The credit reporting bureaus’ job is to report the most accurate information possible, but in the past the Federal Trade Commission has found that 5% of reports have at least one mistake. Get your current credit report from any number of services (start with a free one: you can always subscribe to a paid service later). Check all the accounts and verify that the amounts reported and the account statuses are correct. If a creditor reported your information incorrectly, file a dispute through the credit bureaus’ online sites to get the inaccuracy fixed. The same FTC report says that 13% of consumers who reported an error saw a boost in their credit score.

Get old negative accounts removed

Credit reports carry negative information like missed payments or a collection account for seven years, but are required to delete it after that. If an account is lingering past the seven year mark, use the dispute tools available on credit bureaus’ websites to mark the account as too old for reporting. Note that the seven-year time period is calculated from the date of first delinquency, not the date the account was first opened.

Talk to collection companies about their input

Even when you pay off collection accounts, that history continues to hurt your credit score. Some lenders look solely at those details when starting the process, so even paid collections can disqualify you for a loan. Instead of dealing with this frustrating problem, while you are negotiating with collection agencies to pay off a debt, ask that they put in writing that they will remove their report as part of their part of the bargain for your satisfaction of the debt. Some agencies will and some won’t (but it can’t hurt to ask).

Once you have acted, and begun to see the negatives dropping off your current credit report, your path to local home ownership will open up markedly. Then it’s time to give me a call!

My “Sentiment” Exactly: Mortgage Industry Expectations Rise

If anyone involved in Sussex County real estate were to try to pick a word to characterize the mortgage industry as a whole, “sentimental” wouldn’t be among them. Especially over the past several years, “frustrated” might be apt, or “hog-tied.” Mortgage issuers been hampered by tough rules developed in reaction to the sub-prime mortgage mess. They certainly wanted to issue more mortgages, if only for their own profitability, but until recently, the lending guidelines made that difficult.

In any case, this is an industry that relies on hard facts and statistics to govern lending decisions. Mortgage industry leaders are therefore not inclined to be overly optimistic, overly pessimistic—nor are they prone to exaggeration in their public pronouncements.

So when the powers-that-be at Fannie Mae come out each quarter with their Mortgage Lender Sentiment Survey, the “sentiment” is not the Cry Me a River or You Are the Sunshine of My Life variety. This “sentiment” describes how real estate lenders (presumably including some Sussex County mortgage companies) feel about mortgage business prospects in the coming months. The actual report has a remarkable record of a lack of sentiment: it’s usually pretty much on target.

So it is that when the 2015 first quarter Survey appeared last month (this is one real estate report whose ‘first quarter’ paper actually appears in the first quarter), it sounded another positive note in the assemblage of springtime real estate projections. The summary talked about “an improving outlook among mortgage lenders” because those surveyed “expect mortgage demand…to grow over the next three months.” The hard number was 71% having that expectation, which wouldn’t be surprising, given our entry into the busy spring selling season. The optimism drew more from the fact that this is a substantial improvement compared with the same quarter 2014 (71% vs. the previous 59%).

If the growth they anticipate holds true for our own market, it wouldn’t just indicate improving activity for Sussex County home buyers and sellers. After what they viewed as an “uneven” 2014, Fannie Mae’s Chief Economist Doug Duncan said the results were “consistent with our view that an improving economy, strengthening employment, and increasing consumer confidence” pointed to the more cheerful outlook.

Also cheerful was the picture mortgage issuers expected for their own well-being. A year ago, lenders who thought their profitability would increase were in the extreme minority: 21%. This year, the size of the optimistic group doubled.

Local mortgage applicants could find good news in one more of the reasons for the expectation for mortgage demand to grow over the next three months. The report talked about how last year’s credit tightening was continuing to “trend down.” And there at the top was the headline which mentioned “Gradual Credit Easing.” For anyone who had found it hard to qualify under last year’s rules, that’s very welcome news.

If you will be buying or selling anytime soon, I hope you’ll give me a call: the sentiment here is also the green light kind!