1510 N Bayshore Drive, Milton, De 19968 | $529,000

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Property Details

Have you been waiting for a brand new home just steps to the beach? If so, this is it! An inverted floorplan will allow for amazing views of the the Primehook Wildlife Refuge, a personal elevator will make getting to the 3rd floor a breeze! This we
  • MLS Number: 725702
  • Status: Active
  • Price: $529,000
  • Property Type:
  • Area: Cedar Creek Hundred
  • Community: Broadkill Beach
  • School District: Cape Henlopen
  • Square Footage: 1,850
  • Year Built: 2017
  • Bedrooms: 3
  • Full Bathrooms: 2
  • Half Bathrooms: 1
  • Number of Stories: 3
  • New Construction: To Be Built
  • County Taxes: $222
  • Water View: Tidal Wetland
  • Furnished: No
  • Lot Dimensions: 111x127x181x78
  • Lot Square Feet: 12,408
  • Lot Size Acres: 0.28
  • Lot Description: Cleared
  • Water: Private Central Water
  • Sewer: Mound Septic, Peat System

Interior Features

  • Kitchen: Breakfast Bar, Countertops - Granite, Island
  • Fireplace: Gas
  • Heating: Forced Air, Heat Pump(s)
  • Cooling: Central A/C, Heat Pump(s)
  • Flooring: Carpet, Hardwood, Tile
  • Attic: Access Only
  • Appliances: Cable TV Pre Wired, Dishwasher, Fridge w/Ice Maker, Microwave, Oven/Range Electric, Washer/Dryer Hookup Only, Water Heater Tankless
  • Interior Features: Cable TV Prewired, Ceiling Fan(s), Elevator, Fireplace-Gas, Insulated Door(s), Insulated Window(s), Insulation, MBED-Full Bath, Screen(s), Vaulted Ceilings, Walk-In Closets

Exterior Features

  • Style: Contemporary,Inverted Floorplan
  • Construction Type: Stick/Frame
  • Exterior Type: Vinyl Siding
  • Roofing: Architectural Shingle
  • Foundation: Pilings
  • Garage: Attached
  • Parking: Covered Parking
  • Porch/Deck/Patio: Porch - Front, Porch - Screened

Listing Courtesy of RE/MAX REALTY GROUP REHOBOTH

Ending Ocean View Mortgage Turndowns via Credit Report Action

For anyone who has looked into to buying a Ocean View home several times—but kept getting discouraged every time because of a negative credit report—read on!

You probably already know that you are not alone—but so what?—it’s small consolation, especially when you consider how much financial ground you lose every year you continue to pay rent (the entire amount of which has zero tax deductibility). Many people mishandle credit in their teens and 20s, not knowing how it can come back to bite them when credit reports determine their credit worthiness. In Ocean View, we see the fallout in the form of mortgage application turndowns or discouraging interest rate proposals.

But that just makes it all the more important that you stop letting past errors continue to keep you from getting the loans and rates you want. You can choose to take action now to clean up that credit score. Not only will it speed the moment when you become eligible for the significant benefits of home ownership—the actions you take now will serve to set you in the driver seat when it comes to credit management. You will become aware of any apparently minor oversights that can depress your credit score for years to come. It will put you ‘in the game’ of credit report management, instead of continuing to be a passive outsider.

Steps Ocean View consumers can take now:

Review your credit file for accurate information

The credit reporting bureaus’ job is to report the most accurate information possible, but in the past the Federal Trade Commission has found that 5% of reports have at least one mistake. Get your current credit report from any number of services (start with a free one: you can always subscribe to a paid service later). Check all the accounts and verify that the amounts reported and the account statuses are correct. If a creditor reported your information incorrectly, file a dispute through the credit bureaus’ online sites to get the inaccuracy fixed. The same FTC report says that 13% of consumers who reported an error saw a boost in their credit score.

Get old negative accounts removed

Credit reports carry negative information like missed payments or a collection account for seven years, but are required to delete it after that. If an account is lingering past the seven year mark, use the dispute tools available on credit bureaus’ websites to mark the account as too old for reporting. Note that the seven-year time period is calculated from the date of first delinquency, not the date the account was first opened.

Talk to collection companies about their input

Even when you pay off collection accounts, that history continues to hurt your credit score. Some lenders look solely at those details when starting the process, so even paid collections can disqualify you for a loan. Instead of dealing with this frustrating problem, while you are negotiating with collection agencies to pay off a debt, ask that they put in writing that they will remove their report as part of their part of the bargain for your satisfaction of the debt. Some agencies will and some won’t (but it can’t hurt to ask).

Once you have acted, and begun to see the negatives dropping off your current credit report, your path to local home ownership will open up markedly. Then it’s time to give me a call!

3 Reasons Sussex County Parents May Choose a College Home Rental

For many Sussex County parents of high school seniors, these are hold-your-breath days—the time of year when college acceptance letters begin showing up in Georgetown mailboxes. If all goes well, after settling on a school, next comes tackling the array of decisions that follow. Chief among them: where he or she will live. Many parents tend to take the common course, assuming that a college dorm is automatically the best answer—but a college’s room-and-board plan is actually only one of the possibilities. In fact, it may not be the best financial, social or developmental choice for parent or student. Renting a house can be an intriguing alternative. Here are three of the reasons why some Georgetown parents decide a home rental makes more sense:

1. Cost

Sharing a home rental is often significantly less expensive than renting an apartment—or even a dorm room. Prices vary, but it’s more than possible to end up paying as much as $4,500 per semester for student housing. If your student lives on campus during the summer, fall and spring terms, that would create a $13,500 bill for the year’s housing (the equivalent of paying more than $1,000 in rent per month). Considering that most dorm rooms are tiny, that translates into a much higher cost per square foot than does a shared home rental.

Renting even a one-bedroom home near campus can give your child more space and quiet time to study without interference from fire alarm-pulling pranksters or noisy roommates. Every student is different, and having a place to escape the hustle and bustle of campus life can provide some kids with the extra focus they’ll need for success.

2. Safety

When students live in crowded dorms, many parents worry that they are more likely to catch colds or other communicable diseases. Being packed into a dorm with hundreds of people who may or may not behave responsibly is a dire way to view dorm life, but that is some parents’ view. When their child lives on his or her own or teams with a select group of roommates, some parents breathe easier.

3. Responsibility

With a home rental, any student will learn more about responsible adulthood than when campus authorities assume parental-like responsibility for day-to-day living. Students who are on their own may be wholly or partially enrolled in school cafeteria programs, or may learn to shop for and prepare their own meals. Household and maintenance chores will be theirs to handle, rather than being the province of college employees. In that way, a college home rental can serve almost as a youngster's "starter home." They will graduate from college with a rental history, self-sufficiency skills, and home stewardship experience that will prepare him or her to better care for their own home later in life.

Of course, it’s not universally the best answer to the student housing problem: every institution and child combination are different, and different youngsters respond to independence and responsibility in differing ways. But if you haven’t thought about the possibility, it could be worth looking into. If I can help with a referral to a rental agency—or if you’d like to consider buying—do give me a call!