19017 Charlottetown Way (BRISTOL), Lewes, De 19958 | $420,762

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Property Details

Today's Incentive: $5K towards closing! Bristol twin home on a premium wooded homesite. Features a gourmet kitchen, extended dining area, luxury owners suite, screen porch and fireplace.An amenity-rich resort lifestyle for minimal cost. The gated com
  • MLS Number: 725523
  • Status: Active
  • Price: $420,762
  • Property Type:
  • Area: Lewes And Rehoboth Hundred
  • Community: Coastal Club
  • Square Footage: 2,455
  • Year Built: 2017
  • Bedrooms: 3
  • Full Bathrooms: 2
  • Half Bathrooms: 1
  • Number of Stories: 2
  • Unit Floor Number: 1
  • New Construction: Yes
  • County Taxes: $1,300
  • Association Fee: $2,796
  • Furnished: No
  • Lot Size Acres: 0.00
  • Lot Description: Trees/Wooded
  • Water: Public Central Water
  • Sewer: Public Central Sewer
  • Community Amenities: Bocce Court, Community Center, Dog/Pet Park, Fitness Center, Game Room, Gated Community, Jog/Walk Path, Pool-Indoor, Pool-Outdoor, Sidewalks, Tennis - Outdoor

Interior Features

  • Fireplace: Gas
  • Heating: Forced Air, Gas - Natural
  • Cooling: Central A/C
  • Flooring: Carpet, Hardwood, Tile
  • Attic: Access Only
  • Appliances: Cooktop, Dishwasher, Disposal, Exhaust Fan, Fridge w/Ice Maker, Oven-Self Cleaning, Washer/Dryer Hookup Only, Water Heater Tankless

Exterior Features

  • Style: Townhouse
  • Construction Type: Stick/Frame
  • Exterior Type: Vinyl Siding
  • Roofing: Architectural Shingle
  • Foundation: Concrete Slab
  • Garage: Attached
  • Garage Size: 1
  • Porch/Deck/Patio: Porch - Screened
  • Exterior Features: Irrigation System

Listing Courtesy of OCEAN ATLANTIC SOTHEBY'S INTL REALTY

Home Remodeling Uptick to Follow Rise in Older Homeowners

The number of households belonging to older adults is on the rise across the nation, and (let’s face it) the homes themselves aren’t getting any younger. So states the Harvard University's Joint Center for Housing Studies' Housing Perspectives (JCHS), which recently published the projection that, if true, makes it likely that Lewes home remodeling activity will spike in the coming years.
Abbe Will, research analyst for JCHS drew this conclusion:
"Since much of the housing stock is currently ill-equipped with even basic accessibility features, older homeowners aging in place will need to invest in retrofitting their homes in order to age comfortably and safely.” In other words, even for homes which remain in their owners’ hands, home remodeling activity could grow markedly.
Home remodeling is no minor industry. Home improvement expenditures by older homeowners already topped $90 billion in 2013—making it a significant economic contributor. Now the JCHS projects that it could surge by an extra $17 billion annually over the next three years. Welcome news indeed for the construction and design industries, who had been in the doldrums until recently.
But what does this mean for Lewes homeowners who plan to sell in the near future? When considering a remodel, if you want your home to attract potential older buyers, consider the innovations modern designs have made for individuals in that demographic group. That will be the competition.
JCHS's analysis notes, "… not even a third of (existing) homes have what could be considered basic accessibility features, such as a no-step entry and bedroom and full bathroom on the entry level.” Both young and old can appreciate other features, as well. Wider hallways in a kitchen remodel is one example. Another is bathrooms showers with ‘edgeless’ design, which holds appeal both to Millennial buyers (for the sleek, modern look) and to seniors with limited movement. A bedroom on the main level that can readily be converted to a master if needed can be attractive to older homeowners—and also to anyone looking for a guest or au-pair suite. Investing wisely by thinking long-term when it comes to home remodeling plans is part of strategic home ownership. If you are considering selling your Lewes home at some point, it doesn’t hurt to inform yourself about forward-looking trends.
Wondering what today’s buyers are looking for? I’m here to help with all your Lewes real estate-related concerns: call me anytime this summer! Call/Text me Russell Stucki at (302) 228-7871, email me at russellstucki@remax.net, visit more listings at www.beachrealestatemarket.com.

3 Reasons Sussex County Parents May Choose a College Home Rental

For many Sussex County parents of high school seniors, these are hold-your-breath days—the time of year when college acceptance letters begin showing up in Georgetown mailboxes. If all goes well, after settling on a school, next comes tackling the array of decisions that follow. Chief among them: where he or she will live. Many parents tend to take the common course, assuming that a college dorm is automatically the best answer—but a college’s room-and-board plan is actually only one of the possibilities. In fact, it may not be the best financial, social or developmental choice for parent or student. Renting a house can be an intriguing alternative. Here are three of the reasons why some Georgetown parents decide a home rental makes more sense:

1. Cost

Sharing a home rental is often significantly less expensive than renting an apartment—or even a dorm room. Prices vary, but it’s more than possible to end up paying as much as $4,500 per semester for student housing. If your student lives on campus during the summer, fall and spring terms, that would create a $13,500 bill for the year’s housing (the equivalent of paying more than $1,000 in rent per month). Considering that most dorm rooms are tiny, that translates into a much higher cost per square foot than does a shared home rental.

Renting even a one-bedroom home near campus can give your child more space and quiet time to study without interference from fire alarm-pulling pranksters or noisy roommates. Every student is different, and having a place to escape the hustle and bustle of campus life can provide some kids with the extra focus they’ll need for success.

2. Safety

When students live in crowded dorms, many parents worry that they are more likely to catch colds or other communicable diseases. Being packed into a dorm with hundreds of people who may or may not behave responsibly is a dire way to view dorm life, but that is some parents’ view. When their child lives on his or her own or teams with a select group of roommates, some parents breathe easier.

3. Responsibility

With a home rental, any student will learn more about responsible adulthood than when campus authorities assume parental-like responsibility for day-to-day living. Students who are on their own may be wholly or partially enrolled in school cafeteria programs, or may learn to shop for and prepare their own meals. Household and maintenance chores will be theirs to handle, rather than being the province of college employees. In that way, a college home rental can serve almost as a youngster's "starter home." They will graduate from college with a rental history, self-sufficiency skills, and home stewardship experience that will prepare him or her to better care for their own home later in life.

Of course, it’s not universally the best answer to the student housing problem: every institution and child combination are different, and different youngsters respond to independence and responsibility in differing ways. But if you haven’t thought about the possibility, it could be worth looking into. If I can help with a referral to a rental agency—or if you’d like to consider buying—do give me a call!