19007 Timbercreek Dr., Milton, De 19968 | $214,000

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Property Details

Lovely, nearly new townhouse in the Shoreview Wood Community. Close to beaches, shopping dining, all with in easy drive. Fully upgraded kitchen with granite countertops and stainless steel appliances. Large first floor Master Bedroom with attached fu
  • MLS Number: 724636
  • Status: Active
  • Price: $214,000
  • Property Type:
  • Area: Dewey To Lewes East Of Canal
  • Community: Shoreview Woods
  • School District: Cape Henlopen
  • Square Footage: 1,560
  • Year Built: 2016
  • Bedrooms: 2
  • Full Bathrooms: 2
  • Half Bathrooms: 1
  • Number of Stories: 2
  • Unit Floor Number: 1
  • New Construction: No
  • County Taxes: $849
  • Association Fee: $2,460
  • Pool: Indoor
  • Furnished: No
  • Lot Size Acres: 0.00
  • Water: Public Central Water
  • Sewer: Public Central Sewer

Interior Features

  • Heating: Heat Pump(s)
  • Cooling: Central A/C
  • Flooring: Carpet, Hardwood, Tile
  • Attic: Walk In
  • Appliances: Dishwasher, Dryer-Electric, Fridge w/Ice Maker, Garage Door Opener, Microwave, Oven/Range Electric, Refrigerator, Washer, Water Heater Electric

Exterior Features

  • Style: Townhouse
  • Construction Type: Stick/Frame
  • Exterior Type: Vinyl Siding
  • Roofing: Asphalt Shingle
  • Foundation: Concrete Slab
  • Garage: Attached
  • Garage Size: 2

Listing Courtesy of KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY

Rise in Delaware Real Estate Prices Cause Dominos to Rise

That Milton real estate prices have been on the rise for a while is certainly one factor that has coaxed some of the more cautious buyers off the sidelines. It’s made the market a much more lively (and happy!) place than it was a few years ago—and forecasters are fairly uniform in predicting continuing growth, though at a less overheated pace.

For those who are even more cautious, the question remains whether property values and the Delaware real estate prices that reflect them are likely to hold up over the long haul. They may know that, historically, homeownership has proven to be one of the most reliable investments, but the memory of that financial meltdown from a few years back can be hard to get over…

They may be taking heart from an article I ran across earlier which is bound to boost confidence in the future of Milton’s real estate prices. It was in a weekday edition (February 4) of The Wall Street Journal. Stretching all the way across the top of the U.S. News page was this headline: “Homeowners Acquire a Taste for Remodeling,” over the subhead “Projects Pick Up, to the Tune of $130 Billion in 2013, as Property Values and Equity Rebound; Sign of Market Confidence.”

The article had the expected chart and graph supporting the Journal’s optimistic takeaway depicting “Building Momentum.” Too, there was an illuminating quote from Moody’s Analytics. Moody’s reported an 18% leap in home equity lending—further evidence of the strong rise in home values (banks lend against equity, after all). That, WSJ pointed out, is the root of the steep increase in remodeling activity, because when people have confidence in underlying values, they decide it is worth investing in upkeep and improvements.

Its cause and effect—sort of like a domino chain, but in reverse. The first domino picks itself up, attracting the second, and suddenly all the dominos are back upright.

The Journal summed it up: “If home prices are going up and people have more equity in their home, things like remodeling and refurbishment will do well, because it’s effectively the way of playing the reinvestment game.”

For Delaware contractors and tradesmen, this is a game they’re happy to see resume. And for cautious prospective homeowners who’ve been watching from the sidelines, it’s a good reason to give me a call. Milton real estate prices look like they still have a way to go: there are some great bargains out there!

Savvy shoppers; don’t sit on the sidelines, call/text 302-228-7871or email me, Russell Stucki, REALTOR ® of Beach Real Estate Market to provide detailed information on Delaware homes for sale, investment and commercial properties, luxury and  waterfront homes, condos/townhomes, new construction, lots and land, farms and equestrian properties located in but not limited to Bethany, Bethel, Bridgeville, Dagsboro, Delmar, Ellendale, Fenwick Island, Frankford, Georgetown, Greenwood, Harbeson, Laurel, Lewes, Lincoln, Milford, Millsboro, Millville, Milton, Ocean View, Rehoboth Beach, Seaford, Selbyville, Delaware.

Ending Ocean View Mortgage Turndowns via Credit Report Action

For anyone who has looked into to buying a Ocean View home several times—but kept getting discouraged every time because of a negative credit report—read on!

You probably already know that you are not alone—but so what?—it’s small consolation, especially when you consider how much financial ground you lose every year you continue to pay rent (the entire amount of which has zero tax deductibility). Many people mishandle credit in their teens and 20s, not knowing how it can come back to bite them when credit reports determine their credit worthiness. In Ocean View, we see the fallout in the form of mortgage application turndowns or discouraging interest rate proposals.

But that just makes it all the more important that you stop letting past errors continue to keep you from getting the loans and rates you want. You can choose to take action now to clean up that credit score. Not only will it speed the moment when you become eligible for the significant benefits of home ownership—the actions you take now will serve to set you in the driver seat when it comes to credit management. You will become aware of any apparently minor oversights that can depress your credit score for years to come. It will put you ‘in the game’ of credit report management, instead of continuing to be a passive outsider.

Steps Ocean View consumers can take now:

Review your credit file for accurate information

The credit reporting bureaus’ job is to report the most accurate information possible, but in the past the Federal Trade Commission has found that 5% of reports have at least one mistake. Get your current credit report from any number of services (start with a free one: you can always subscribe to a paid service later). Check all the accounts and verify that the amounts reported and the account statuses are correct. If a creditor reported your information incorrectly, file a dispute through the credit bureaus’ online sites to get the inaccuracy fixed. The same FTC report says that 13% of consumers who reported an error saw a boost in their credit score.

Get old negative accounts removed

Credit reports carry negative information like missed payments or a collection account for seven years, but are required to delete it after that. If an account is lingering past the seven year mark, use the dispute tools available on credit bureaus’ websites to mark the account as too old for reporting. Note that the seven-year time period is calculated from the date of first delinquency, not the date the account was first opened.

Talk to collection companies about their input

Even when you pay off collection accounts, that history continues to hurt your credit score. Some lenders look solely at those details when starting the process, so even paid collections can disqualify you for a loan. Instead of dealing with this frustrating problem, while you are negotiating with collection agencies to pay off a debt, ask that they put in writing that they will remove their report as part of their part of the bargain for your satisfaction of the debt. Some agencies will and some won’t (but it can’t hurt to ask).

Once you have acted, and begun to see the negatives dropping off your current credit report, your path to local home ownership will open up markedly. Then it’s time to give me a call!