18332 Hudson Rd, Milton, De 19968 | $109,900

I like it!

Email me 18332 Hudson Rd, Milton, De

*



* Required Fields

  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
  • Image Loading. Refresh your browser.
View Map
If this text does not disappear quickly, then your browser does not support Google Maps

Property Details

Great location only 15 minutes to the beach. This lush lot has over half an acre, backs up to trees and has a large 12x22 shed. The main section of this home has 3 bedrooms and 2 baths. The attached breezeway with wood burning stove has a screened
  • MLS Number: 723375
  • Status: Active
  • Price: $109,900
  • Property Type:
  • Area: Broadkill Hundred
  • School District: Cape Henlopen
  • Square Footage: 1,700
  • Year Built: 1971
  • Bedrooms: 3
  • Full Bathrooms: 2
  • Number of Stories: 1
  • New Construction: No
  • County Taxes: $351
  • Furnished: No
  • Lot Dimensions: 89x267x97x266
  • Lot Square Feet: 24,829
  • Lot Size Acres: 0.57
  • Lot Description: Cleared, Landscaped
  • Water: Well
  • Sewer: Gravity Septic

Interior Features

  • Fireplace: Wood Burning
  • Heating: Baseboard Electric, Forced Air
  • Cooling: None
  • Flooring: Carpet, Laminate, Tile
  • Appliances: Dryer-Electric, Exhaust Fan, Fridge w/Ice Maker, Microwave, Oven/Range Gas, Washer, Water Heater Electric
  • Interior Features: Bedroom-Entry Level, Broadband Access, Cable TV Prewired, Ceiling Fan(s), Fireplace-Wood, MBED-Full Bath, Screen(s), Walk-In Closets

Exterior Features

  • Style: Double Wide
  • Construction Type: Mobile (Prior 1993)
  • Exterior Type: Vinyl Siding
  • Roofing: Asphalt Shingle, Metal
  • Foundation: Other See Remarks
  • Parking: Driveway/Off Street
  • Porch/Deck/Patio: Porch - Screened
  • Exterior Features: Storage Shed/Outbuilding

Listing Courtesy of KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY

News Flash! Men, Women House Hunters Differ!

Last week, The Wall Street Journal made it official: they had a slow news day. It was February 11 (that was Wednesday) when they ran the feature story, "A Gender Gap in Real Estate."

This was something Milton house hunters (not to mention those hoping to attract their attention) could certainly appreciate: an article about what men and women consider "very important" when it comes to features in homes. Author Adam Bonislawski based his story on National Association of Realtors® survey information; the results pointed to some dissimilarities between what women and men look for.

Now, I’ve had a good deal of experience helping both men and women house hunters in Milton, so it didn’t come as a complete surprise that their priorities differ. For instance, I was not at all surprised about the contrasting emphases the two put on the importance of having a walk-in closet in the master bedroom. The only surprise was that it was the men who found it much more important (38%-29%)!

What about house hunters’ feelings about the importance of kitchen appliances being new? Same phenomenon: men 38%, women 29% (possibly because appliances are gadgets, and men like the newest gadgets). How important is it that a home be single level? The sexes reverse: Male house hunters think it is very important 18% of the time; women, 31%. I’d bet that within the 18% that are masculine we’d find a disproportionate number of stay-at-home dads.

House hunters registered a big gap when it comes to rating 9-foot or higher ceilings as very important. A miniscule 8% of females agreed, while nearly three times that many of their male counterparts thought so (21%).

One harder to guess feature would have been the desirability of a kitchen island. Nineteen percent of male house hunters found it very important, versus just 8% of the females. Does this mean women are tired of entertaining? Do they no longer consider their masculine counterparts capable of sous chef action? Or is it that more men are taking over the cooking duties?

I’d have to admit, I’m less than certain that these national averages are 100% reflective of what house hunters in Milton prefer. Yes, Milton men certainly value attics (13%) more than the ladies (7%)—they do tend to spend more time up there (but neither are terribly committed to that form of high living). Basements are preferred by close to equal numbers.

Being that these findings are sort of interesting (not fascinating, perhaps, but at least sort of interesting), you might be wondering why at the beginning I thought it was evidence that the WSJ was having a slow news day. It’s because of some tiny print at the bottom of a graph, which gave the date of the NAR survey—all the way back in 2013! More up-to-date is what we find unfolding for today’s Milton house hunters: give me a call to get the latest!

 

“Sentiments” Milton Mortgage Applicants Can Applaud

If anyone involved in Milton real estate were to try to pick a word to characterize the mortgage industry as a whole, “sentimental” wouldn’t be among them. Especially over the past several years, “frustrated” might be apt, or “hog-tied.” Mortgage issuers been hampered by tough rules developed in reaction to the sub-prime mortgage mess. They certainly wanted to issue more mortgages, if only for their own profitability, but until recently, the lending guidelines made that difficult.

In any case, this is an industry that relies on hard facts and statistics to govern lending decisions. Mortgage industry leaders are therefore not inclined to be overly optimistic, overly pessimistic—nor are they prone to exaggeration in their public pronouncements.

So when the powers-that-be at Fannie Mae come out each quarter with their Mortgage Lender Sentiment Survey, the “sentiment” is not the Cry Me a River or You Are the Sunshine of My Life variety. This “sentiment” describes how real estate lenders (presumably including some Milton mortgage companies) feel about mortgage business prospects in the coming months. The actual report has a remarkable record of a lack of sentiment: it’s usually pretty much on target.

So it is that when the 2015 first quarter Survey appeared last month (this is one real estate report whose ‘first quarter’ paper actually appears in the first quarter), it sounded another positive note in the assemblage of springtime real estate projections. The summary talked about “an improving outlook among mortgage lenders” because those surveyed “expect mortgage demand…to grow over the next three months.” The hard number was 71% having that expectation, which wouldn’t be surprising, given our entry into the busy spring selling season. The optimism drew more from the fact that this is a substantial improvement compared with the same quarter 2014 (71% vs. the previous 59%).

If the growth they anticipate holds true for our own market, it wouldn’t just indicate improving activity for Milton home buyers and sellers. After what they viewed as an “uneven” 2014, Fannie Mae’s Chief Economist Doug Duncan said the results were “consistent with our view that an improving economy, strengthening employment, and increasing consumer confidence” pointed to the more cheerful outlook.

Also cheerful was the picture mortgage issuers expected for their own well-being. A year ago, lenders who thought their profitability would increase were in the extreme minority: 21%. This year, the size of the optimistic group doubled.

Local mortgage applicants could find good news in one more of the reasons for the expectation for mortgage demand to grow over the next three months. The report talked about how last year’s credit tightening was continuing to “trend down.” And there at the top was the headline which mentioned “Gradual Credit Easing.” For anyone who had found it hard to qualify under last year’s rules, that’s very welcome news.

If you will be buying or selling anytime soon, I hope you’ll give me a call: the sentiment here is also the green light kind!