23 Harbor, Rehoboth Beach, De 19971 | $1,695,000

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Property Details

Rare opportunity to own this 6 bedroom waterfront retreat situated on the yacht basin in North Shores with dock at your backdoor. Very short stroll to private guarded beach or community pool/tennis. Seller was one of the first to select this prime pa
  • MLS Number: 720571
  • Status: Active
  • Price: $1,695,000
  • Property Type:
  • Area: Dewey To Lewes East Of Canal
  • Community: North Shores
  • School District: Cape Henlopen
  • Square Footage: 4,012
  • Year Built: 1961
  • Bedrooms: 6
  • Full Bathrooms: 5
  • Half Bathrooms: 1
  • Number of Stories: 1
  • New Construction: No
  • County Taxes: $1,953
  • Association Fee: $2,300
  • Waterfront: Canal/Lagoon
  • Water View: Canal/Lagoon
  • Dock Type: Against Bulkhead Only
  • Furnished: No
  • Lot Square Feet: 14,952
  • Lot Size Acres: 0.34
  • Lot Description: Water Access
  • Water: Public Central Water
  • Sewer: Public Central Sewer
  • Community Amenities: Basketball Courts, Beach, Pool-Outdoor, Tennis - Outdoor

Interior Features

  • Kitchen: Countertops - Solid Surface, Eat In
  • Fireplace: Gas
  • Heating: Heat Pump(s)
  • Cooling: Central A/C, Window Unit(s)
  • Flooring: Carpet, Hardwood, Tile, Vinyl
  • Basement: Crawl Space
  • Security: Security Guard(s)
  • Appliances: Dishwasher, Disposal, Dryer-Electric, Fridge w/Ice Maker, Microwave, Oven/Range Electric, Washer
  • Interior Features: Bedroom-Entry Level, Fireplace-Gas, MBED-Full Bath

Exterior Features

  • Style: Rancher/Rambler
  • Construction Type: Stick/Frame
  • Exterior Type: Vinyl Siding
  • Roofing: Architectural Shingle
  • Foundation: Concrete Block
  • Parking: Driveway/Off Street
  • Porch/Deck/Patio: Deck - Rear
  • Exterior Features: Dock

Listing Courtesy of RE/MAX REALTY GROUP REHOBOTH

Now or Later: When Is the Right Time to Buy a Rehoboth Beach Hom

A few weeks ago, an eye-catching article surfaced on the Investopedia web site—one with the arresting title of “When is the Right Time to Buy a Home?” I have always assumed that for prospective Rehoboth Beach home buyer, the answer to that question varies by the individual circumstances. But if there is a more cut-and-dried universal answer, it would certainly be good to know it. Definitely worth reading.

Despite its name, Investopedia is not an encyclopedic history of investing. Its own history is interesting, though—it started in Canada, was acquired by Forbes, then sold a short while later to ValueClick for $42,000,000 (talk about good investments)!

The article that was to supply the answer to “When is the Right Time to Buy a Home?” did turn out to have the right answer, though it’s a little less definitive that you would hope—prospective Rehoboth Beach home buyers don’t get the simple “NOW” or “LATER,” which would be most useful. However, before the final answer is presented, scattered between the many ads and other clickbait that apparently pay for Investopedia are some interesting current facts and observations, and several cop-outs.

When it comes to the big question, “When is the Right Time to Buy a Home?” by halfway through the article, it’s looking a bit more like “now” than “later.” It cites The National Association of Home Builders’ Housing Opportunity Index, which now finds that nationally, the majority of homes are affordable for families earning a median income of $63,900. True, most Rehoboth Beach families don’t earn exactly $63,900, but still, it’s good to know. Reading on, we learn that this level of affordability has been better in the past, and might be better later “unless mortgage rates move higher in the future.” Since elsewhere on the site we find that “the consensus is that interest rates will rise,” it doesn’t take Sherlock Holmes to deduce where “When is the Right Time to Buy a Home?” is leading.

Or so you might assume, before the article quotes a saying on Wall Street: Don’t try to time the market, which Investopedia advises also applies to real estate. Oddly enough, it also says, “If you’re looking for an edge, interest rates are near historic lows so now appears to be a better time than most for purchasing a home.”

That’s a pretty strong hint, but the answer isn’t spelled out. Yet. There follow some bits of good advice (hire an inspector prior to purchasing a home; don’t buy a car while your credit is being checked; inquire about taxes) before we get to the ultimate heading, “THE BOTTOM LINE.” It took a while, but here is the advice Rehoboth Beach readers would have been looking for all along, bottom-linewise.

Investopedia’s answer for “When is the Right Time to Buy a Home?” is a lot more sensible than most: “When you can afford it.

I couldn’t agree more. Even if all the other factors weren’t as positive as they are today, being able to make a good fit financially is at the top of the list. If now is that time for you—or if it’s time for you to put your own Rehoboth Beach home on the market—it’s also a good time to give me a call!

Sussex CountyHome Décor: How ‘Decade Sensitive’ are You?

First of all, a Spoiler Alert: It’s not fair to peek down where the answers are! Now that we’re clear on that, this is a quiz that will tell you how "Decade Sensitive" you are when it comes to Sussex County home décor. It took a little browsing around to put this together, but it sure was fun.

The idea is to match the décor item with the decade it is most closely associated with. Ready? GO!

A. Popcorn Ceilings

B. McMansions

C. Sherwood Green & Stratford Yellow

D. Stainless Steel Appliances

E. Shag Carpets

F. Sustainable Materials

G. Kitchen Islands

The 50s

The 60s

The 70s

The 80s

The 90s

The 2000s

NOW

Now that you’ve matched the items with the decade, you’ve probably noticed that there is a lot of ambiguity here, because Sussex County home décor themes didn’t just go in and out of style at the beginnings and ends of decades. The answers are combed from a variety of sources, but here is what the consensus (sort of) agrees on:

THE ANSWERS

The 50s: Answer-C. Sherwood Green and Stratford Yellow were first popularized for kitchen appliances during the postwar era. The 50s can be forgiven for these unnatural apparitions, which might have had something to do with the advent of vinyl flooring in the kitchen …

The 60s: Answer-A. Popcorn Ceilings – Thank you, The 60s, for giving us this innovation. They were popularized for conveying a "textured" look, adding insulation, and cutting down sound. We’ve been scraping them off ever since…

The 70s: Answer-E. Shag Carpets (of course!). Sometimes associated with the 60s, but unmistakably reaching peak popularity in the 70s, a "period when wall-to-wall carpeting was fairly new." Its fluffy look and feel remained popular until The 90s, when it is said to have "faded into oblivion." Hardly—it’s still causing vacuum cleaner jams in Sussex County homes with cool "vintage" décor.

The 80s: Answer-B. McMansions, aka "garage Mahal," "starter castle," and "Hummer home." They may have been around since The 70s, but the term first appeared in the Los Angeles Times in 1990. Even the wisecracking nickname couldn’t curb the irresistible advantages of the mass-produced luxury home. Unexpectedly, some of them turn out to have been quite well-built.

The 90s: Answer-G. Kitchen Islands. If you placed these in The 80s, you’ve got a good argument, because that’s the era when modern kitchen design really took off. In The 90s, though, the ‘island’ first took its place in the majority of new kitchens spacious enough to make it practical. They are still everywhere, so you’re forgiven if you put them in The 2000s or Now.

The 2000s: Answer-F. Sustainable Materials. Even defining "sustainability" can get you into an argument (it could be salvaged wood countertops; might be granite), but the Green movement that took off in The 60s began to get serious government support in the New Millennium.

NOW: Answer-D. Stainless Steel Appliances. You can’t get away from them: today’s prospective Sussex County home shopper is finding glistening stainless steel refrigerator and oven doors in kitchens all over the place. This finish may have been around for more than a decade, but is NOW available at so many price points it’s hard to think of a single décor item that is as widespread—or one that’s more likely to stay popular long into the future.

With or without the stainless steel appliances, if yours is one of the Sussex County homes that will be listing this spring, do give me a call!