23 Harbor, Rehoboth Beach, De 19971 | $1,799,000

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Property Details

Rare opportunity to own this 6 bedroom waterfront retreat situated on the yacht basin in North Shores with dock at your backdoor. Very short stroll to private guarded beach or community pool/tennis. Seller was one of the first to select this prime pa
  • MLS Number: 720571
  • Status: Active
  • Price: $1,799,000
  • Property Type:
  • Area: Dewey To Lewes East Of Canal
  • Community: North Shores
  • School District: Cape Henlopen
  • Square Footage: 4,012
  • Year Built: 1961
  • Bedrooms: 6
  • Full Bathrooms: 5
  • Half Bathrooms: 1
  • Number of Stories: 1
  • New Construction: No
  • County Taxes: $1,953
  • Association Fee: $2,300
  • Waterfront: Canal/Lagoon
  • Water View: Canal/Lagoon
  • Dock Type: Against Bulkhead Only
  • Furnished: No
  • Lot Square Feet: 14,952
  • Lot Size Acres: 0.34
  • Lot Description: Water Access
  • Water: Public Central Water
  • Sewer: Public Central Sewer
  • Community Amenities: Basketball Courts, Beach, Pool-Outdoor, Tennis - Outdoor

Interior Features

  • Kitchen: Countertops - Solid Surface, Eat In
  • Fireplace: Gas
  • Heating: Heat Pump(s)
  • Cooling: Central A/C, Window Unit(s)
  • Flooring: Carpet, Hardwood, Tile, Vinyl
  • Basement: Crawl Space
  • Security: Security Guard(s)
  • Appliances: Dishwasher, Disposal, Dryer-Electric, Fridge w/Ice Maker, Microwave, Oven/Range Electric, Washer
  • Interior Features: Bedroom-Entry Level, Fireplace-Gas, MBED-Full Bath

Exterior Features

  • Style: Rancher/Rambler
  • Construction Type: Stick/Frame
  • Exterior Type: Vinyl Siding
  • Roofing: Architectural Shingle
  • Foundation: Concrete Block
  • Parking: Driveway/Off Street
  • Porch/Deck/Patio: Deck - Rear
  • Exterior Features: Dock

Listing Courtesy of RE/MAX REALTY GROUP REHOBOTH

Now or Later: When Is the Right Time to Buy a Rehoboth Beach Hom

A few weeks ago, an eye-catching article surfaced on the Investopedia web site—one with the arresting title of “When is the Right Time to Buy a Home?” I have always assumed that for prospective Rehoboth Beach home buyer, the answer to that question varies by the individual circumstances. But if there is a more cut-and-dried universal answer, it would certainly be good to know it. Definitely worth reading.

Despite its name, Investopedia is not an encyclopedic history of investing. Its own history is interesting, though—it started in Canada, was acquired by Forbes, then sold a short while later to ValueClick for $42,000,000 (talk about good investments)!

The article that was to supply the answer to “When is the Right Time to Buy a Home?” did turn out to have the right answer, though it’s a little less definitive that you would hope—prospective Rehoboth Beach home buyers don’t get the simple “NOW” or “LATER,” which would be most useful. However, before the final answer is presented, scattered between the many ads and other clickbait that apparently pay for Investopedia are some interesting current facts and observations, and several cop-outs.

When it comes to the big question, “When is the Right Time to Buy a Home?” by halfway through the article, it’s looking a bit more like “now” than “later.” It cites The National Association of Home Builders’ Housing Opportunity Index, which now finds that nationally, the majority of homes are affordable for families earning a median income of $63,900. True, most Rehoboth Beach families don’t earn exactly $63,900, but still, it’s good to know. Reading on, we learn that this level of affordability has been better in the past, and might be better later “unless mortgage rates move higher in the future.” Since elsewhere on the site we find that “the consensus is that interest rates will rise,” it doesn’t take Sherlock Holmes to deduce where “When is the Right Time to Buy a Home?” is leading.

Or so you might assume, before the article quotes a saying on Wall Street: Don’t try to time the market, which Investopedia advises also applies to real estate. Oddly enough, it also says, “If you’re looking for an edge, interest rates are near historic lows so now appears to be a better time than most for purchasing a home.”

That’s a pretty strong hint, but the answer isn’t spelled out. Yet. There follow some bits of good advice (hire an inspector prior to purchasing a home; don’t buy a car while your credit is being checked; inquire about taxes) before we get to the ultimate heading, “THE BOTTOM LINE.” It took a while, but here is the advice Rehoboth Beach readers would have been looking for all along, bottom-linewise.

Investopedia’s answer for “When is the Right Time to Buy a Home?” is a lot more sensible than most: “When you can afford it.

I couldn’t agree more. Even if all the other factors weren’t as positive as they are today, being able to make a good fit financially is at the top of the list. If now is that time for you—or if it’s time for you to put your own Rehoboth Beach home on the market—it’s also a good time to give me a call!

Finally, Sussex County Boomerang Buyers See Daylight

There is a seven-year window for some past Sussex County homeowners—and it’s one that’s opening, not closing. The ‘window’ in question is the one that could activate Frankford "Boomerang Buyers"—which would come as good news for the local home sales.

Some background about Boomerang Buyers. It’s a term coined in the wake of the subprime mortgage fiasco, describing those burned by the housing crisis. They were, on the whole, Baby Boomers and GenXers who were caught up in the Great Recession. For many who became enmeshed in the effects of the nasty confluence of the cliff-dive of the subprime mortgage bond market and collapse of residential valuations that swept the nation, foreclosures or short sales became, literally, offers they couldn’t refuse. Not only did the bitter aftertaste leave many with a spoiled appetite for homeownership, but the damage done to the credit ratings of millions made that a moot point: they had fallen off the scale when it came to qualifying for a new mortgage.

But that was then; this is now. It’s a now that, in RealtyTrac Newsroom’s breathless phraseology, "the first wave of…homeowners who lost their home to foreclosure or short sale during the foreclosure crisis are now past the seven year window they conservatively need to repair their credit and qualify to buy a new home."

Soon, more and more Boomerang Buyers in Frankford will be in the clear, if they choose to be; and they are only the first wave. "Nearly 7.3 million potential boomerang buyers nationwide will be in a position to buy again from a credit repair perspective over the next eight years," says Newsroom. Bankrate, the mortgage and financial advice website, sees the group as particularly well-qualified. They quote a broker in North Carolina to that effect: "If you’ve been through a foreclosure, you’ve already been a homeowner…you know the process. You’ve been through hell sometime in the last seven years…"

That word ‘sometime’ is apt, because the seven year period has been anything but uniform. Guidelines for that "waiting period" have sometimes been three years for FHA qualifiers, or even shorter for portfolio loans that lenders keep on their own books. But whether it’s three or seven years, the clock usually starts ticking only when a foreclosure has been completed. But according to FICO, although a foreclosure remains on a credit report for seven years, "the negative impact will fade as time passes."

For potential Sussex County Boomerang Buyers still waiting for a foreclosure to disappear altogether from their credit reports, there are other routes that can lead to a homeownership reboot. For more on buying or selling, I’m always pleased to sit down and discuss some of the great opportunities in our current market!