1904 Coastal Hwy., Dewey Beach, De 19971 | $459,000

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Property Details

The Surfrider is only 90 steps to the beach and located on the OCEAN BLOCK of New Orleans St. Easily considered one of the best condominiums in town with top notch restaurants on the first floor (Woody's & Salad Factory) and a well kept exterior that
  • MLS Number: 716559
  • Status: Active
  • Price: $459,000
  • Property Type:
  • Area: Dewey To Lewes East Of Canal
  • Community: Surfrider
  • School District: Cape Henlopen
  • Square Footage: 1,249
  • Year Built: 1998
  • Bedrooms: 3
  • Full Bathrooms: 2
  • Number of Stories: 2
  • Unit Floor Number: 2
  • New Construction: No
  • County Taxes: $591
  • Condo Fee: $3,409
  • Furnished: Yes
  • Lot Size Acres: 0.00
  • Water: Public Central Water
  • Sewer: Public Central Sewer

Interior Features

  • Kitchen: Breakfast Bar
  • Heating: Heat Pump(s)
  • Cooling: Central A/C
  • Flooring: Carpet
  • Appliances: Dishwasher, Disposal, Dryer-Electric, Fridge w/Ice Maker, Microwave, Oven/Range Electric, Washer, Water Heater Electric

Exterior Features

  • Style: Contemporary
  • Construction Type: Masonry
  • Exterior Type: Stucco
  • Roofing: Flat
  • Foundation: Poured Concrete
  • Parking: Assigned, Driveway/Off Street
  • Porch/Deck/Patio: Balcony(s)

Listing Courtesy of 360 PROPERTY SOLUTIONS

Buying a Home: What’s New in Flood Insurance

When Dewey Beach residents hear about floods, images of homes tumbling into the sea or half-submerged along the banks of a raging river probably leap to mind. But the risk of flooding isn’t confined to those headline-grabbing catastrophes—which is why the recent passage by Congress and signing by the President of the Homeowner Flood Insurance Affordability Act (HFIAA) will be of interest to many people thinking of buying a home.

Sellers are required by law to disclose if a property is in an officially-designated flood zone; and banks typically check this information as well. While it can certainly be off-putting to be informed of this when buying a home, the availability of flood insurance can keep it from being a deal-breaker. But “available” doesn’t necessarily mean “affordable”—which is where HFIAA comes in.

Many prospective Dewey Beach homebuyers are only vaguely aware that flood and water damage are not covered under traditional homeowner policies, something that’s newly relevant when buying a home. Part of the reason is because only 5% of the U.S. population lives in an officially designated “Coastal Flood Plain”—so it’s not a much-discussed issue in most parts of the country.

But the coastal areas that do get attention whenever disaster strikes are not the only kinds of flood plains that are relevant. FEMA assesses and maps areas that are subject to flooding, and assigns them letters denoting the likelihood of flood damage. Some of the provisions of the new HFIAA deal with overhauling those procedures, but the most immediately significant parts deal with (you guessed it) cost.

Here a little history will be helpful. In 1968, the National Flood Insurance program was created to help some property owners secure insurance in areas where it had been prohibitively expensive. But, as one might expect, the cost of the program soon became a problem. That in turn triggered passage of another Act—the Biggert-Waters Flood Insurance Reform Act of 2012—intended to allow premiums in covered areas to rise to offset their real costs.

The new HFIAA now partially reverses that yet again, because policy-makers fear the effect on the housing market. The new act delays some of the price rises for four years and allows homeowners who sell their homes to pass the lower premiums on to the new homeowners. It’s also relevant that there are two different types of coverage available: dwelling only and dwelling/property. Although dwelling only coverage is cheaper, as you might expect, there’s a good reason: it doesn’t cover the personal belongings that a flood could destroy.

Some zones, like Zone X, are as inexpensive as a few hundred dollars per year. The zones that flood more regularly can run into thousands…and all flood insurance premiums are in addition to the regular home insurance costs. For those buying a home in an area where properties might be classified as within a flood zone, it’s a good idea to check with one of the local insurance companies that offers flood coverage. When all is said and done, only you can decide if it’s worth the risk or not.

If you are thinking of buying a home in Dewey Beach this year, flood insurance is only one of the details you’ll want to consider. Call me today and we can begin by putting together a list of your search criteria.

Flipping a Home in Sussex County: Clearing the Finance Barrier

In conjunction with the rise in house prices, the profit potential for flipping a home in Sussex County is once more drawing the entrepreneur-minded. 

Flipping a home is the process of purchasing a property—often one in a rundown condition—then improving its value and reselling it for a quick profit. Quick is the key word in this strategy, since a fast turnover allows capital to be devoted to purchase and renovation rather than operating and maintenance costs. It’s why successful house flippers generally focus on quick gains over maximizing profits.  

While this has proven to be a lucrative strategy in the past, financing has always been the first major hurdle for anyone flipping a home in Sussex County. If you’ve been noticing some of the inviting house-flipping prospects in Sussex County, several financing routes sometimes make such a deal possible: 

Larger Down Payment

Flipping a house in Sussex County in the current lending market will often require a significant down payment. Since launching the project might require at least 25 - 40% for financing, it’s essential that you prepare sufficient cash reserves to complete the renovations envisioned—and successful house flippers suggest you add 20% to the cost estimate!   

Seller Financing

Seller financing—a mortgage provided by the home owner—is also called a ‘purchase money’ mortgage. Sellers may be willing to provide financing if they have had trouble selling their property, which is often the case when a Sussex County home flipper believes its value, can be greatly enhanced by repair or remodeling. Seller financing would be more common were it not necessary that the original owner own the home outright.

Hard Money Loan

Hard money loans—also known as short-term bridge loans—are another common source of financing for flipping a home in Sussex County. Hard money loans are backed by the value of the property rather than the credit record of the borrower, and typically feature a lower loan-to-value ratio than found in a bank mortgage. The added risk has a cost: expect to provide a large deposit and a premium for the loan (often 8% or more).

While sub-prime mortgages may no longer be as readily available as they once were, there are still multiple sources of financing for entrepreneurs who can spot profit possibilities for flipping a home in Sussex County. With real estate prices continuing to rise, this spring again holds promise in the house-flipping arena. Call/text 302-228-7871 or email me, Russell Stucki, REALTOR ® of Beach Real Estate Market to provide detailed information on Delaware homes for sale, investment and commercial properties, luxury and  waterfront homes, condos/townhomes, new construction, lots and land, farms and equestrian properties located in but not limited to Bethany, Bethel, Bridgeville, Dagsboro, Delmar, Ellendale, Fenwick Island, Frankford, Georgetown, Greenwood, Harbeson, Laurel, Lewes, Lincoln, Milford, Millsboro, Millville, Milton, Ocean View, Rehoboth Beach, Seaford, Selbyville, Delaware.